WELCOME READERS

Shadow Fire Lady has a book trailer!

One day you finally knew what you had to do, and began, though the voices around you kept shouting their bad advice— though the whole house began to tremble and you felt the old tug at your ankles. “Mend my life!” each voice cried. But you didn’t stop. You knew what you had to do, more »

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The weekly crush is a collection of the best blog posts, news articles, and links shared on twitter and Facebook this week.  Sharing is love, guys.  Click around, find something to titillate you, and hopefully squeeze the last bit out of summer like Godward’s idle ladies below. The Sweet Siesta of a Summer Day by more »

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Baby by Gustav Klimt (1918) I ran across this video the other day by Yuvi Zalkow and not only did it make me smile, the writing advice clicked.  It’s totally worth 9 minutes of your day, especially if you’re feeling lost in the middle of a manuscript, killing yourself over time management, or just plain more »

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Jiri Trnka may be a forgotten illustrator, but once you see his work, you’ll know he’s memorable.  He illustrated a mid 20th century edition of Hans Christian Anderson’s and while the drawings are a bit creepy for children, they are freaking gorgeous. He’s my biggest share this week, but I’ve also compiled an abbreviated selection more »

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“Self-consciousness is the enemy of all art, be it acting, writing, painting, or living itself, which is the greatest art of all.” Ray Bradbury, The Secret Mind (1965) ************************************************************************************* Because Monday requires inspiration

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The Nut Gatherers by William Adolphe Bouguereau (1882) Prevent cardboard bogeymans when creating your villain by doing something that comes naturally: “Humanizing the villain.” In the 18th century, oysters were readily available to peasant and noble Real lives from the French Revolution: Theresia Carrbarrus Tallien A fascinating Woman’s Hour BBC podcast on the suffragettes in 1913 more »

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“I was born of cold copulation, white-fleshed and waxy like a crust of fat on beef broth left outside in winter.  I was born of seed that would have seized with frost if spilled on the newlyweds’ bed.  I was born on the twenty-seventh of September because in the month of January my parents had more »

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Young Lady with a Bird and Dog by John Singleton Copley (1767) Hardwick Hall and the Duke of Devonshire Using spider webs to predict the weather (19th century) A Victorian’s Perspective on the difference between Americans and the French An 18th century midwife mannequin to teach apprentice midwives from the court of Louis XV WereGeorgian more »

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Go ahead.  Break a few eggs.   Eat a few burnt and spongy omelets until one day: Perfect. Freaking. Omelet. Boy with Broken Egg by Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1756) “Sometimes all that saves me is being willing to make mistakes.  There are projects that strike me as so beautiful, so important, complicated, or just plain big, more »

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La Belgique by Guillaume Seignac (1914) I’ve been so busy writing and watching the Tour de France this week that I’m lacking in links, but I did  manage to curate a few favorite history posts.  If you’ve read anything great this week, do share.  Either way, enjoy! Adding that final touch: Regency garnishes from The Cookbook more »

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